Season 3, Episode 3 - Stereotypes Americans Have of British People Ft. Shana

Dec 1 / Charlie Baxter

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By Charlie Baxter

Season 3

What's this episode about?

In this third episode of Season 3, Charlie invites a guest who is fast becoming a regular back on the show called Shana. She is the host of The American English Podcast. Let's see how she reacts to a list of stereotypes Americans are known for having thought of British people over the years. So, let's see what Americans REALLY think of us Brits.

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Transcript of S3/E3 - Pt. 1 Transcript

Charlie:
Hello and welcome to the British English podcast with your host, Charlie Baxter. Today we have an episode all on stereotypes that Americans have about British people that might not actually be so true. And for that reason, we have Shana back on the episode or on the show, rather, Shana from the American English podcast. Hello, Shana! Lovely to have you back. How are you doing today?

Shana:
Hi, I'm doing really well. I'm- yeah, I'm feeling a bit more upbeat after having a big lunch. And so, yeah, I'm ready to talk about this very fun, fun topic.

Charlie:
Yeah, good. And before we get into that, we didn't actually say how we are. We didn't check in with each other. So how's your couple of weeks been going for you? You- you well?

Shana:
Oh my gosh, there is so much going on in my life. I- I don't even know where to begin. The exciting news is that on this weekend, we're going to Hawaii, which I'm very excited about. It's our big first family trip. So my, my mom and my dad gave us a- this, as a present for Christmas about two or three years ago now to go as a big family. And so that- not just, yeah, not just like mom, pop, and us, but like also my brother, my sister, their kids. And yeah, we're going to be spending a week on the beach, getting some- catching some rays. Yeah, it's going to be fun.

Charlie:
Catching some rays, nice. Quite American, that. So I would say, yeah, a bit boring. Sunbathing, sunbathing, that's all we've got. Is that all we've got? Getting burnt to a crisp?

Shana:
Basking in the sun. Yeah, burnt to a crisp. I hope I don't get burned to a crisp.

Charlie:
No, that's not the aim, is it? Yeah, no. We don't want skin cancer, but that is generally what British people do when we go abroad. That's unbelievable. Hawaii, that's you know, I think Hawaii is one of the most exotic locations for a British person. Is it- is it that exotic for Americans?

Charlie:
This episode comes with a free worksheet over on the website, www.thebritisenglishpodcast.com So grab that and you can listen along whilst using it.

Shana:
Not at all. It's actually the main destination, probably travel location for people from California. So yeah, actually and also for people from Japan, because it's sort of, not really in the middle, but, you know, we kind of go from different directions and meet there. So you'll- you'll see a lot of Californians and a lot of Japanese people in the-.

Charlie:
Interesting!

Shana:
High rises in Waikiki. Yes, it's fun.

Charlie:
But I bet you don't get many Brits. Have you met a Brit in Hawaii?

Shana:
You know what? I honestly have not met very many British people on vacation. I have met British people in southern Spain when I went to.

Charlie:
Yes. Loads of us there.

Shana:
Yeah, we went to- what is it? Mijas in Malaga and-.

Charlie:
Malaga, we say. Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly.

Shana:
But yeah, other than that, I really haven't met too many British people on vacation, which is interesting because I really do make it a point to go out and talk to people. So I don't know why that is! Random.

Charlie:
Do you- do you get the flower necklace when you arrive? That's what we think of or I-.

Shana:
The lei?

Charlie:
Oh, OK, the lei.

Shana:
Yeah, we call it a lei L E I, I believe. And so there's always the joke that when you go to Hawaii, you get 'leid' because actually when you get off the plane in the airport, they place one over your head. So.

Charlie:
Really.

Shana:
They actually place a lei on you. Yeah. And so we went the first day. Yeah, yeah. So on the first day, everybody wears their lei and then usually the flowers die and it's not so pretty.

Charlie:
So you're going to Hawaii and you're going with your family. A big, big group of you. So do you enjoy the idea of this? Like, completely love the idea of it? Or is there some part of it that makes you a bit nervous?

Shana:
Mm hmm. There's quite a few things that make me a little bit nervous just with little kids next to the beach and actually, next to the ocean, I mean. Actually, after our last conversation, you kept mentioning sharks, and I realised I had absolutely no idea of any. I didn't know anything about sharks, and you kept mentioning all of these things, and I was like, Oh my gosh, I need to do my research. And I did a full episode on Sharks. And I'm now very aware that there are a lot of tiger sharks swimming in the ocean in Hawaii, not near the beaches, where actually a lot of the tourists go, but they are out there and they're slow. And then when they want to attack, they go for it. So that is-.

Charlie:
Are they- are they quite aggressive to humans or not?

Shana:
That's the one- I looked at the attack list. I don't know why I did that, and they're always the tiger sharks that bite the humans, that Galapagos shark-.

Charlie:
Oh no!

Shana:
So I don't know which-

Charlie:
What was the other one?

Shana:
Galapagos, which I'm not really sure what that one is. But anyway, that's not my concern about being with the big family. I guess maybe if all of us are out in the water where we're going to be a little bit more safe. But that's actually, I think that's the biggest concern right now. But anyway, I appreciate you talking about that last episode, really, because I learnt so many wonderful things.

Charlie:
Isn't it great how in our job, like if we get an idea of something that we want to research, we can make it part of our episode and we can research it for our job.

Shana:
Exactly, exactly. I mean, you just talking about the Maldives last time, it's like, I can't tell you how many pictures I looked at of the Maldives and going like, I need to. Maybe I'll do another episode on this, even though it has nothing to do about the United States. But anyway, you got lots of stories to share, that is for sure. And I appreciate it.

Charlie:
Yeah. Well, okay. So British people think that Hawaii is a very exotic place, but yeah, ok. So it's a common place for Californians to holiday. That was my attempt at segueing onto stereotypes Americans have for British people. It didn't really work, but we'll go into the first stereotype. And this actually came up when I was watching Austin Powers. So do you remember these films? Austin-.

Shana:
Yes.

Charlie:
Like, Austin Powers?

Shana:
Austin Powers. That was back in the 90s, wasn't it?

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah. Yeah. And the main character, Austin Powers, he has pretty awful teeth, doesn't he?

Shana:
Oh, the worst.

Charlie:
Yeah.

Shana:
Big buck teeth. Yellow, if I remember correctly.

Charlie:
Yeah, but yellow. Yeah, very big. In your face. They're very in your face, aren't they? And I would say that that was playing on the stereotype that Americans think that British people have bad teeth. Do you think that that was the reason that they played that?

Shana:
Yeah, that I'm- I'm not really sure if I had ever seen any sort of film with British people in it before Austin Powers, to be honest. So that may have been my first perception of British people in general. My first exposure as a, I don't know if I was like eight or something like that. And so, yeah, that's- those sort of images definitely stick.

Charlie:
Yeah.

Shana:
But as a kid, I don't think it's something that you would, I mean, go around saying, Oh, all British people have- have bad teeth based on Austin Powers, you know what I mean? But it's something that you hear, you definitely hear that. Occasionally if there's a show on now- nowadays, of course, there are so many different British shows that you can be exposed to, if you go on Netflix or if- I don't know what other Hulu or things like that, but there's always a comment. If you're with a group of people or just like family members will say, Oh, look, there's a British person. And I think because there's that stereotype, people are hyper aware. So if there is ever one British person, even if there's a group of 20 people with perfect teeth, they will comment on that one person, 'Look! That person, look! It's a British look! They have bad teeth. Look at their teeth. Why do they all have such bad teeth?' And it could just be one person in the group. You know what I mean? Yeah, hyper awareness, I'd call it.

Charlie:
Yeah, and I suppose that a natural bias that allows you to find it. If you're looking for it, you can find it. But I will say, having been to America and Germany and Australia now, I think that there's a reason for it, which we can get into. But before we do. Yeah, that that stereotype is played through films. I saw it in The Simpsons before, when they were playing a British person, they had a very big tooth or something. So you kind of notice it, you guys. Do you- do you feel like growing up having perfect teeth was a very important thing in your culture?

Shana:
Yes, definitely. Yeah. So you think about like you lose your baby teeth when you're- how old? I don't know. Between maybe seven- seven years old, you start losing your baby teeth, say, for example. Right after you start losing your baby teeth, like we automatically get braces. Like I had braces. Probably I-

Charlie:
Automatically get braces?!

Shana:
Yeah. So for example, I had braces twice for a total of four years. This is like crazy. So I had them when I was nine, between nine and 10, I believe, and then also my first two years of high school and actually wore a headgear. I'm not sure if you've seen that.

Charlie:
I have.

Shana:
And then after I got that off, I got my teeth whitened. So it was like this very intense. Yeah, you wouldn't be able to tell nowadays because I didn't wear my retainer very often and I-.

Charlie:
Oh you got pearly whites, they're great. Yeah, just-.

Shana:
Thank you.

Charlie:
Taking them in right now. Yeah, yeah.

Shana:
That's funny.

Charlie:
That's- that's amazing. So you would automatically go to braces, whereas in my upbringing, braces, they were pretty rare, I'd say. I mean, not rare. Every- every class had a couple of kids with braces, but it definitely, definitely wasn't like anywhere near 80-90 percent of the kids having them. And I think-.

Shana:
That's interesting.

Charlie:
So the reason being is we have the NHS that takes care of our national health at- it's a free service and dentistry up to the age of 16, I think is covered by the NHS. Once you go over that age, it, it's paid for by the person. But I went to America and I met a dentist, and he explained how it is kind of commission based, like when they get a client, if they upsell them, they make more money. And I was like amazed by that a little bit.

Shana:
Really?

Charlie:
Like in a little bit of a negative way. But it made me think maybe that's why dentistry is so forced on you guys. And then the culture is to have perfect teeth and- and, versus- We have a free system that doesn't really want to give out free services unless you have to. So it's kind of like an extreme version when we get braces. What do you think?

Shana:
That is interesting. I didn't know about the upselling- selling thing. I haven't heard about that before, but it's definitely private here. And parents, like it's just common, like everybody's parents are willing to shell out like a, big bucks for braces. And it's just, it's just common. Like you said, 80 to 90 percent like definitely wouldn't be those numbers in England, whereas here for sure, like you do not want it to be that kid in the classroom with the- the jacked up teeth. That's-.

Charlie:
Ah, right. Ok, so yeah, we're kind of the opposite. So actually, this is the first thing on the list of stereotypes Americans have about British people that aren't actually true, but it is actually kind of true. I think over the last 20 years, it's gotten less extreme and we're becoming more comfortable with having braces. And Invisalign is changing the game a bit. This, you know..

Shana:
Right, heard about that.

Charlie:
Brace that you can't really see? Yeah.

Shana:
Yeah. It's sort of like a retainer that's clear that goes over your teeth. Yeah, it's- it's also interesting. I'm not sure if you guys have this. It's funny. Also, I just have to mention really quick talking to you because you also have pearly whites. Got to mention that. And a lot of the younger people I've noticed, the British people that I've met also have perfect teeth. So this is yeah, it's kind of funny to talk about this as a stereotype because it's not something that I'm like, Oh my gosh, British people have bad teeth. It's just, you know, something you hear. It's this like random, you know, stereotype that's floating occasionally as mentioned and- and such so I...

Charlie:
Yeah,

Shana:
I recognise you guys, you guys are looking good.

Charlie:
Yeah, but actually, I got a comment on my Instagram after doing a story and they said, 'You need Invisalign.' It wasn't even a hello. It was just, 'you need Invisalign.' And I was like, 'That's not the normal way British people say hello, but thank you for saying hello.' And then they said, Oh, you're hot, but you need Invisalign. I was like, Oh. Interesting way of communicating. Thank you, but it's because my tooth at the bottom, there, has come out of place.

Shana:
Oh, I see. But one out of, you know, how many?

Charlie:
Yeah. Well, I think, yeah, but my girlfriend now, she's just invested in getting kind of similar to Invisalign. I think people are getting a bit more comfortable with it. But yeah, it's interesting. I think it's still exists. So guys, British people probably have worse teeth than Americans, I'd say. Yeah.

Shana:
Yeah, I have no idea. But one thing that, I don't even know if I should mention this. But when I was in high school, I had some good friends that I made that were foreign exchange students living in the U.S. and they were like, This is right after I did my whitening from an over-the-counter kit called Crest White Strips, and they were like, How are your teeth so white? It's crazy. And they're like, I want white teeth like that. And I was like, I swear this thing works. And they were like, OK, I'm going to- I'm going to buy it, it's super cheap. They bought it, and both of them went back home with perfectly white teeth. And this is not an ad, by the way, but it's like, it's something- it's something that you can buy over the counter here. That's just kind of like, Oh, everyone does it! Except your teeth get super sensitive-.

Charlie:
I was going to say-

Shana:
So you can't drink a coffee afterwards and you're like, ooh or water or whatever it is.

Charlie:
Yeah, I think we have a feeling that American health care looks after your physical looks more than the actual, you know, well-being of the human. I don't know if people spend much time thinking about that in the UK, but I've kind of got that conclusion because of an example of what you just said, like you guys are comfortable with the whitening, but it mucks up your teeth a little bit in terms of sensitivity.

Shana:
Yeah, but that's actually over the counter. So that's something that you can, you know, you don't even need a prescription for that one that's like.

Charlie:
And that's what I mean. Yeah, that's pretty dangerous, in my opinion. Like, you can just do it as often as you like.

Shana:
Oh, yeah, yeah. The cosmetic stuff is a lot of stuff you can just get at the regular grocery store, which I mean, yeah, definitely probably wouldn't be able to do there. Maybe. No? I don't know.

Charlie:
No. Yeah, but OK. So terrible teeth. The next one we have on the list is that we all speak in the same posh accent. What do you think about this immediately?

Shana:
Well, the first thing that came to mind was a video I saw, probably, I don't know, maybe 10 years ago, of this British guy, he's blonde, that did about over 20 accents. I'm not sure if you've seen that video, it went viral.

Charlie:
Yes, I have.

Shana:
And that was. Do you have anything to say about that? Were they good? I don't know...

Charlie:
Yeah, they were very good. Yeah, they were very good. Ok. Yeah, yeah.

Shana:
Anyway, so that was my first, I guess, exposure to the different types of, yeah, the different ways to speak in Britain. And I thought that was crazy cool because it's such a small, I mean, it's an island, you know, it's like you guys are not that big. And I mean, there's just so many things going on. I can't remember if he talked about Ireland or not. But yeah, definitely. There were so many things to be said about it, for sure.

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah. So there are a lot of accents and that video made you aware of them, ok. So when you think of British accents, let's put aside the Scottish, Irish, Welsh ones. What do you think of when you think of English accents? Do you have an awareness? Well, you're a language teacher, so you've got more of an awareness- awareness. But if you were to think of the layman in America, what would they maybe assume?

Shana:
So we actually do something whenever we want to pretend that we are fancy. We pick up a Posh British accent, all of a sudden. Like out of nowhere. We kind of mock, you know, I don't even want to do it on your podcast, it's so embarrassing. But yeah, we will. We definitely have that sort of go to idea in mind, of, you know, Harry Potter. No, I'm not going to do it.

Charlie:
Go on! Do it! Do it!

Shana:
Oh man, I don't even know. No, no. Wait. I'll bring it up some, some other point in this episode. You guys keep listening. But yeah, so there is definitely the- that idea like Harry Potter sort of. Maybe- let me think of what other actresses, Emma Watson, you know, the actresses that you know, you hear speaking in interviews and such. They're kind of the perception that we have.

Charlie:
Yes. Yes, I see what you mean. And I mean, again, in the last 20 years, things have developed, but the BBC accent has definitely predominantly been this stereotypically posh accent. Now, radio broadcasters are from, you know, all areas of the UK, which is wonderful, but to export that knowledge in the last 20 years is probably going to be quite slow. So I totally understand why most people think of English accent as this posh accent. Mine is relatively close to that posh accent. It's not like, 'Oh hello darling', it's not quite extreme like that, but it is relatively close to what people call it Received Pronunciation. Also, we could call it a neutral southern British accent. But apparently from just a quick Google, only two percent of people living in the UK speak with Received Pronunciation. So-.

Shana:
Wow.

Charlie:
Pretty, pretty small numbers there, isn't it?

Shana:
Wow. So do you think if you were listening... Let's say like BBC. Do you think people from all of these, these outskirt cities and like out in the rural England that like were born and raised in a place that speak differently? Do you think they actually like change the way they speak in order to be a, you know, newscaster on the BBC? Like, do you think they need to speak that way, and-.

Charlie:
Yeah, unfortunately, I would say that people still feel pressured. Back in the day, definitely. People literally change their accents to try to become actors and actresses and stuff like that, which is a shame. But yeah, I've got friends that have become senior managers in big companies, and he, the one that I'm thinking of, is from Birmingham, and they have quite a strong Brummie accent. Alright bab, how's it going? And that was a terrible one, but they say 'bab' a lot. Anyway, he nullified that, he brought it down and he started to have a very neutral southern British accent, which, yeah, he feels like was necessary to make himself feel more respected. Again, a huge shame, but it's interesting to talk about.

Shana:
So do you feel like when like just- it doesn't sound snobby, does it? Like if someone has a posh, like, very posh accent?

Charlie:
I get comments of being snobby and posh. So I think a lot of- I mean, as as we just said, if only two percent of people were speaking like this, again, mine's not truly Received Pronunciation. My aunties have Received Pronunciation. And yeah, people would generally feel a little bit like, Oh, they're kind of maybe talking down on me or they think that they're better in some ways. If they're sensitive to it, if they're sensitive to it.

Shana:
Yeah, I was just curious. If someone says, Oh, this is posh or that's posh. Does that have negative connotation?

Charlie:
I feel like it does. I've obviously been on the- that kind of side of it, and I've always felt like I just want to not be associated with that one category and then it- Flip reverse. If people feel like they've got a more working class accent, people might have a chip on their shoulder for being stereotyped as not educated. So we have this- this thought. People are trying to get over it, and I think it would be great to. But yeah, it's definitely there. Yeah, but-.

Shana:
That's fascinating.

Charlie:
So you guys- when I went to America, you guys like to do the British accent, and it's definitely the posh one. You definitely like to do the posh one.

Shana:
Yeah. Yeah, we do it sometimes for fun. I'm a little bit too embarrassed to do it right now, but yeah, you know, you watch a show with it and you can't help but like, imitate it because you- it does sound pretty cool. Like, we always have this very positive opinion about British accents and just, you know, if a woman says, Oh, he has a British accent, it's something that's conceived, perceived as very, very attractive. So I would say it's a yeah, I would say it's a good thing.

Charlie:
Yeah, actually, there's a couple of films. I think the hot- no, not the holiday. A Christmassy one. Love, Actually. Love, Actually. Yes.

Shana:
I love that film.

Charlie:
He comes over as a Brit to America, and he- he gets a lot of attention from the girls at the bar, doesn't he?

Shana:
Yeah, I think they pick some rural town. And so I don't. Yeah, it was really over the top, that scene with these girls. The Americans were always- they're- all of them were dumb in that film! The Americans were like this, like the president of the United States, was this horrible, egotistical man, which is kind of funny. And then Hugh Grant's, of course, this, you know, the best prime minister ever. But yeah, anyway, it was yeah, I believe it could be like that in some places if there there was a British accent. Could get you farther.

Charlie:
It's funny. Okay, so the next one is about being highly cultured. This kind of ties in with what we're talking about. Highly cultured beings who know the queen and love opera. And about the accent, I do feel like people thought I was more well-read or more academic than I really am, just because they thought, Oh, he's British. Is that true?

Shana:
It sounds like that. And there are some things I've realised that British people say. Like you mentioned in my podcast episode, pardon and they're like, Pardon. If you said that in American English, it's so proper. It's so proper that you automatically come across as extremely polite and extremely, you know, cultured and like, there's a lot of things that just with the word choice itself that can make someone seem like more educated or, you know, well-read. Pardon is one of them. I was thinking of some of the other ones like, you guys use 'may I?' I believe a lot more than we do. Like we say, can I- can I get this, please? Can I do this? Can I, you know, which I'm sure you guys probably think is not very nice or maybe not as polite. But I think just your word choice, in general.

Shana:
Also the accent itself, those two things tied together give that impression. And I think people also know, you know, OK, Shakespeare and Keats. And you know, I can't even remember, Lewis Carroll and all of these very famous authors come from Britain, and you guys have such like a- I think there's the impression that there's just a very- just a literary society. Just, everybody is reading, reads all the time. Maybe the weather. Maybe it's a little bit cooler out. Some, like, subtle rain, drizzle, sitting by the fire with a book. It's just this image I think we get when we're thinking of the English countryside or, you know, even an apartment in London.

Charlie:
It's yeah, I think the grass is always greener, isn't it? But yeah, I think it might be something to do with what I've witnessed of people in America liking to talk about their ancestry and linking it back to where they came from before they came to America. Whereas we don't have that like interest in finding where we came from, I guess, because we feel like we came from where we are, which is, you know, subjective, depending on how long we go back. But yeah, do you have that interest into people around you? Want to know where they're from in Europe?

Shana:
Most definitely my family is interested in it. I can't say I am, and they always are surprised by that because they're like, 'You- you travel so much. You always go to other places.' And my mom has this book that dates our family back to the 1500s. Like every single name, it's the genealogy, a family tree. Everything about everybody is in this book, and I also have Ancestry.com, where I think you just you send in your spit, which I did. I did that and found out because my mom wanted me to.

Shana:
And the- the point is, yeah, people are really into where they came from. And for me, and I don't mean to like, discredit this for anybody that's listening. But I figure if you go back far enough in time, there were just fewer people. So you were like related to all of like, of course, I was related to King Henry VIII, you know, because you know, we- we were back over in Europe and Europe at that time. We lived in England, you know, like, I'm not- I'm not really related to him, but you get the point like, there are just fewer people.

Charlie:
So true. Yeah, yeah. If you go far enough back, yeah, I'm sure we're all related.

Shana:
Are you guys not? Are you say you're not at all interested in genealogy or...

Charlie:
I think my sister did a family tree, but I would say most of us don't really think about that, and I've just heard it on quite a few American podcasts. I probably listen to more American than English just because there's probably more American podcasts, but I've just heard it quite a lot that they're like, Oh yeah, my family is from Germany or my family's from Italian. And a lot of the time people say I'm Italian and they're American, like they've- they've got their two generations in to America and they still say, I'm Italian. I find that interesting because I don't see that in the UK as much.

Shana:
It's kind of odd to mention that, I think to someone who was outside of the United States because amongst Americans, you kind of know, OK, you came from someplace else, not unless you're Native American or, you know, somebody else that was here beforehand, an indigenous community. And so amongst Americans, it's common. You know, where are you from? Like, where's your family from? And then, well, people will say that. But to say it to a British person is kind of odd. I feel like because it's like it's a different, you know, different type of communication, you have to say, Oh yeah, my relatives were from X Y Z.

Charlie:
Yeah.

Shana:
So but I definitely hear that often. So.

Charlie:
Interesting.

Shana:
Definitely not Italian. If you've been here for two generations.

Charlie:
Although I yeah, I do respect that. Obviously, they have family heritage that they've probably passed down cultural behaviours. But yeah, so going to The Queen and loving opera. Is that something that you think that all Americans around you might think of as British people know The Queen or love opera?

Shana:
You know, opera? Not so much. Like I would think of theatre, like Shakespeare's theatre, and plays and things like that. And definitely that just because just all the writers and screenplays and things that are, yes, screenwriters that are in Britain. But yeah, operas, I would think more of France, probably.

Charlie:
Mm mmm, yeah.

Shana:
The Queen? I- I noticed that I actually feel the tendency to want to ask every British person I meet if they know The Queen. Because I figure she's got to know some people, right? She has to know. She's- right? I mean, she's a woman. She's everywhere! She like is out and about like she's she's pretty old and she's like, still getting out. So there is a high- I feel like it's a legitimate question, is it not?

Charlie:
Oh my god, that's hilarious. I really like that. I feel like you're somebody who's travelled around. You've got your head screwed on and that's still in you. You still want to find somebody who is related to the Queen if they speak with a British accent. I think that says a lot about the stereotype.

Shana:
No, but no, no, no, not related. Like more like, you know, do you know her? Like, Are you like buddies? Do you hang out at her table where she's not allowed to? Not allowed to comment on her passing gas?

Charlie:
That was a joke that was made in the episode that we did on Shana's podcast. So go have a listen to that on the American English podcast. Do you know the name of this episode yet? That will- what it will be?

Shana:
Embarrassing stories or something like that?

Charlie:
Something like that? Yeah. Check that one out. It was a good one. Ok, so we've busted the myth of the posh accent. Only two percent of people, apparently, in terms of what I've researched, which was two minutes of Googling. Two percent of people in the UK speak with a posh accent. We apparently do have a bit of a stereotype of terrible teeth, although we're getting better, we're getting better with that.

Charlie:
And no, not many of us know the Queen, but you guys still apparently like the idea of asking the question. But there we go. So that is the end of Part One. We're going to carry on with Part Two and Three, and we're going to be talking about drunken football hooligans, food in the UK, if you guys think it is terrible. And whether Britain means England for you guys and a lot more. But yeah, if you're here just for Part One, make sure you go and check out Shana's podcast, the American English podcast and we will see you next week. But thank you very much, Shana, and I look forward to continuing the conversation in Part Two and Three.

Shana:
Thank you. Looking forward to it! Bye!

Charlie:
Excellent. Bye bye.

Charlie:
That's all for me this week. I hope you have a good seven days ahead of you. My name is Charlie Baxter, and I will see you next time on the British English podcast.

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MEET TODAY'S GUEST

Shana

Shana does a very similar podcast to this show but for American English learners. She's lived in a handful of places over her years and now resides back in the states with her Brazilian husband and two young daughters. 
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Podcast host: Charlie:
This will be quite a bit harder for you to understand, as there are a number of accents in the conversation, some poorly delivered at times, as you will notice.

Podcast host: Charlie:
But the aim is to give you a variety of dialects in one conversation and some dialogue to give you native expressions in context. So enter, if you will, to Charlie's pub and his imaginary world.

Character: Mike:
Alright geezer, how's it going?

Character: Chris:
Yes, I'm well thanks. How about you? Have you had a good day?

Character: Mike:
Can't say good mate. No my old man he's been giving me a right old earful for what happened on site last week.

Character: Chris:
Oh that's a pity. Are you back on your dad's building project again?

Character: Mike:
Sad to say mate, but yeah, I am. Couldn't resist this one though. Cash in hand, you know.

Character: Chris:
Oh fair play, hard to resist those I imagine. Oh, here she is.

Character: Emily:
Oh, hi.

Character: Chris:
I was wondering if you're ever going to join us tonight.

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