Bonus Episode 15 - How Many British Legends Do You Know... Besides The Queen?

Dec 14 / Charlie Baxter

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By Charlie Baxter

Bonus Episodes (9-16)

What's this episode about?

Ever found yourself lost in a conversation with British people who are talking about "famous" people that you've never even heard of before? Well, Charlie wanted to help you get to know some of the UK's household names. Join the conversation he has with Pete from Aussie English to see if people from down under have ever heard of these Brits.

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Meet today's guest

Pete

from Aussie English

Pete's goal is simple: to help you rapidly improve your English whilst learning about Australian history, culture, current affairs, and more!

He does that through his Podcast, YouTube Channel, social media and his Academy over on his website.
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Transcript of Bonus Ep 15 - Pt. 1 Transcript

Charlie:
Hello and welcome to the British English podcast. My name is Charlie Baxter, and I am here to tell you all about British people that British people know. And I wanted to get my friend from the Aussie English podcast Pete to, you know, see if he knows anything about these British people and help you understand what somebody outside of the UK might know of of them and then figure out where we need to go from there. Because these people, they come up in conversation quite a lot within native conversations. So I want to help you guys feel comfortable when they reference these names so that you don't feel, you know, like you're a stranger listening to a conversation that you can't input into. So let's get Pete on. How are you doing, Pete? Hello, and thank you very much for being here.

Pete:
No, it's a pleasure. Thanks for having me on, Charlie.

Charlie:
All right. So we're both in Australia at the moment, so I'm in Sydney. Pete, some further down. Whereabouts you?

Pete:
Down Under. You know, I'm in a suburb called Curlewis, which is about an hour and a half away from Melbourne.

Charlie:
Nice. Nice. Yeah, and that's fairly near Geelong. Am I pronouncing it right?

Pete:
Yeah, yeah. Geelong, that's 25 minutes away.

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah. So we were planning to live in Geelong, which was coincidentally very near you, and that was before we even met.

Pete:
You should have. It's cheaper.

Charlie:
It is cheaper... Yeah, and they've got- they got Billabong there?

Pete:
Oh, you mean the brand?

Charlie:
Yeah.

Pete:
Yeah, that's down at Torquay. So that's Billabong and there'll be Rip Curl and a bunch of those other surf brands that sort of started up down near Bells Beach, which is that, you know, quote unquote best surf beach in the world, at least Australia. But yeah, so a lot of that stuff started up in, I think, the 60s and 70s down there in Torquay,

Charlie:
Right. Yeah, I've been down to Torquay.

Pete:
Does it blow your mind? We have all these places in Australia that have these British names like Torquay?

Charlie:
It's very confusing, very confusing because Sydney has loads of names like Liverpool.

Pete:
Yep.

Charlie:
And people. Yeah, reference them very regularly. I'm like, Oh, OK, OK, yeah, you mean the Sydney version?

Pete:
Yeah, yeah, it's crazy.

Charlie:
And when we went down to Torquay, we saw a load of young surfers doing like surf camp, and they looked amazing. Are you, are you a fan of surfing? Have you ever been out?

Pete:
Yeah, yeah, I used to when I was a kid down at a beach called Ocean Grove Beach, which is probably about, what would you say, 25 minutes to the east of Torquay along the coast. So sort of the opposite way from the Great Ocean Road and lawn and everything. So yeah, I used to go surfing a little bit, though never really got fully into it. And you know, the thing that always freaked me out was sharks. I was always like, Jesus Christ, this crap just seems full on, you know, you'd see them sometimes from up on the cliffs, in the water. And yesterday, last night, two children, I think two teenagers were bitten by a shark down at my local beach. And I'm just like, Screw that, I'm so glad I don't surf.

Charlie:
We went down to Jervis Bay. Do you say Jarvis or Jervis Bay?

Pete:
I would say Jervis, but I heard recently that it is Jarvis. But it's the weirdest -er spelling, right? E R, you would not expect it to be.

Charlie:
Yeah.

Pete:
'-er', but yeah, I'm pretty sure- I would have said Jervis prior to that knowledge.

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah, I- I wasn't sure whether to go with the Jervis or Jarvis, but either way, we were there last weekend and the guy that was taking us through this sea kayaking tour, he was showing us a coiled looking seaweed piece and that's a shark egg.

Pete:
Yeah.

Charlie:
He was teaching me about this, except...

Pete:
They're going to be the smaller, sort of reef kind of sharks that hang around the bottom of the ocean there near the- all the reefs. And they lay the eggs and they entangle around the seaweed and everything and then just effectively wait there.

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah. It was mad, though, to pick the- the coil of seaweed looking thing up, and it was, you know, the old version of an egg of a shark.

Pete:
Yeah. Did you see was there an opening in it where you saw it had gotten out?

Charlie:
Uh, yeah, he did actually show us that. And then he showed us, like, how it was actually going to be fully formed when it came out.

Pete:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. The craziest thing too about Jervis Bay, Jervis, Jarvis Bay. It's part of Canberra, right? So it's part of the ACT, but it's not, which is the capital. Canberra is the capital of Australia, and it's inside the Australian Capital Territory, which is within New South Wales. But Jarvis Bay is this tiny, tiny part of Canberra or of the ACT on the coast of New South Wales, which gives the- the territory access to the ocean.

Charlie:
Right. Yeah, yeah. I remember we crossed into ACT and we were like, tick!

Pete:
Woah, I can smoke weed!

Charlie:
Ah! I didn't know that!

Pete:
Yeah, they've got those laws that's been in the news recently to- where they're trying- the greens are trying to legalise Cannabis Australia wide, and I think the ACT's had these laws of not punishing people growing it or smoking it now for the last two years, and they've been all over the news anyway.

Charlie:
Oh okay.

Pete:
So you missed your chance.

Charlie:
Yeah, I'm going to try and segue here. So we were talking about, you know, nature and that and sharks and all the biological things around sharks. And you had a very famous Aussie guy that died probably about 10 years ago now. He was- he was stung by a stingray, I think?

Pete:
It's funny, isn't it? You wouldn't really think you could be stung by a fish. You'd think it's sort of an insect related attack, right? It sounds a bit weird to be stung by it. Well, ray, I guess, I don't know if it's a fish, but yeah, so that was Steve Irwin, and I think that would have been in 2006. So that's almost 15 years ago. It's crazy, isn't it? Time flies.

Charlie:
Yeah, that's a long time ago. Yeah. So Steve Irwin, he probably occasionally pops up into conversation?

Pete:
Less and less as the years passed. But yeah, his family's always around, you kind of like, Oh, guys, give it a rest. But yeah, his family is always, you know, on Dancing With the Stars or on some TV show being interviewed just for being related to Steve Irwin. But yeah, he's- he definitely did. When he was alive, he would always be in conversation, particularly with Americans, because Americans would always know him, because he got big over there first. No- Australians didn't really know who he was prior to him getting his TV show in the US, and always being on the- I don't know, is a Saturday Night Live or whatever, with different animals and, you know, freaking the people out. And he was married to Terri Irwin, who was an American woman and say, Yeah, but...

Charlie:
Okay.

Pete:
Occasionally he comes up still.

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah. So here's what we would call a household name, a name that the whole of the three generations probably know and is very synonymous with celebrity. But yeah, we have an equivalent, I would say, of Bear Grylls. You know, Bear Grylls, I assume.

Pete:
The guy who drinks his own urine in the desert. Yeah.

Charlie:
Exactly. Yeah, he doesn't have a shark to impress you with, so he'll he'll drink a bottle of piss.

Pete:
What's funny how he leaned into that, right? So originally it was that survivor show of whatever it was. Was it just called Bear Grylls? Or was it- have- did it have another name, that TV show that he had?

Charlie:
He's had loads of TV shows, but yeah,

Pete:
The original one where he got famous for just being dropped in the wilderness in all around the world and then had to kind of survive. And I feel like I remember the first series where he was doing that, and I think the first time he had to eat something weird. Obviously, that episode got a heap of traction and people watching him eating an insect or the testicle of a goat or drinking his own piss or something. And then he obviously leant into that. And every single episode after that, he was always eating, consuming something weird, you know, really close to the camera and trying to describe how disgusting it was. And you kind of like, Mate, this is. This has gone a bit past survival.

Charlie:
That's true. Maybe 'Bear Grylls' Wild Adventure'? Would that have been it?

Pete:
I think something like that, yeah.

Charlie:
Yeah. He's had literally like over 12, 13 different television broadcasts. But yeah, so he's a- he's a household name Bear Grylls, and he was the equivalent to your, yes, Steve Irwin kind of fella. But then going on from Bear Grylls because I feel like that's fairly obvious. If he comes up in conversation, he's talking about weird shit that people eat in the wild. Maybe surviving on your own urine, that kind of conversation.

Pete:
Which is something we- anybody would suggest you don't do, by the way.

Charlie:
Oh yeah. Why is that?

Pete:
I think it's just it dehydrates you faster, from what I understand. So they just- I think they, from what I understand, I remember hearing about this where it was that Bill- Bear Grylls did this, and everyone was like, Oh, you just drink your own piss. I'm pretty sure people just say, you know, try to avoid sweating as much as possible. Stay somewhere cool. But drinking your own urine would be like drinking seawater where it's going to get you to- it's going to get you to get rid of more water as a result of doing that because you're filling yourself up with so many concentrated salts and other minerals and everything that's in there.

Pete:
So it's going to dehydrate you faster. Don't quote me, but I'm pretty sure that that's the thing. So that's why it was always interesting seeing Bear Grylls always drink at his pierce. I'm like, I'm pretty sure that this is not the survival advice that they give.

Charlie:
Well, luckily, this show isn't an S.O.S. guide, kind of, you know, survival guide. But yeah, good to know. And also thinking about it, I would be sweating about the idea of drinking my own piss, so that would be terrible at the same time.

Pete:
You should probably just let your piss cool down and then pour it on yourself, and then that's probably a better use of it.

Charlie:
Oh yeah, this is- this is getting disgusting. So we're going to jump over to a different category. Although before we go on to that, I should mention, you know, a national treasure, David Attenborough.

Pete:
Oh!

Charlie:
That probably most of these listeners know about. But who is David Attenborough, Pete?

Pete:
Oh, I'm pretty sure it's Sir David Attenborough, isn't it?

Charlie:
Very good, very good. Yes. Good correction!

Pete:
Well, he's probably the most famous naturalist that's ever existed, right? Beyond maybe, someone like Charles Darwin, but he got huge for- from memory, in the 1940s and 50s, travelling around and capturing animals in the wild to bring back to zoos. And he had his own, I think, a TV show, as well as books at the time, but then became that documentary narrator and, yeah, host for a lot of those huge docos done around the world showing different things, you know, different animals.

Pete:
And one of the biggest ones I remember is when they did the killer whales in, I think, either Chile or Argentina that throw themselves up on the beach chasing after seal pups. And remember that blowing my mind. And one of the more recent ones was those iguanas hatching. I think in the Galapagos and the snakes chase them down. All of a sudden, the snakes are all waiting and the little baby iguanas come out of the sand and it's like, instantly, it's like 'Run for your lives!' So, yeah,

Charlie:
Yeah, they had an epic soundtrack to that. Yeah, that really got my heart pumping. Yeah, he's had some amazing shows. And yeah, as you said, he's the commentator that we associate with all of these amazing documentaries around the planet. Blue Planet was one of them. Blue Planet Two.

Pete:
I mean, there's everything right? Plants, oceans, mammals like, you know, he's done all those different series. But yeah, I think I'm going to cry when he dies. Probably more than Steve Irwin, right?

Charlie:
Yeah. Yeah, I think everyone will shed a tear. And amazingly, I found out that Oprah Winfrey was the narrator for a lot of these series for Americans, so they didn't really know about David Attenborough.

Pete:
It's almost offensive, right? That they...

Charlie:
It does feel better.

Pete:
Put an American in there because these Americans won't want to be, you know, watching TV shows about life. And, you know, these awesome TV shows because there's a British guy talking, it's like, Come on, guys, Jesus.

Charlie:
Yeah. And yet Australians were very comfortable with it.

Pete:
Oh yeah, 100 percent. We were fine. It would be- I can't imagine if they tried to put an Aussie in there, it would just be- it would be horrible. I mentioned that Steve-O and instead of David Attenborough, you'd be like, 'What are you doing?' So yeah, but how cool is it, too, did you know his brother was in Jurassic Park?

Charlie:
Whose brother?

Pete:
David Attenborough's brother has- his brother is Richard Attenborough, who was the guy that was in Jurassic Park. Were holding the cane with the amber and like, "There!" Like...That's his brother.

Charlie:
Wha-?! Oh yeah! I'm just looking at him now. Oh my god.

Pete:
Yeah.

Charlie:
That's amazing. And he's Lord Attenborough.

Pete:
Yeah, he was older than David, I'm pretty sure.

Charlie:
Yeah. Okay, gotcha. Yeah. So that's David Attenborough. Now we're going to go on to a completely different area of life, and I'm interested to see if you know of this guy. He's a famous businessman in the UK, and he does a show all about, you know, cutthroat business and trying to make it, trying to get a business off and- off and running or starting a business up.

Pete:
Mm hmm.

Charlie:
Alan Sugar? Again, Sir Alan Sugar, have you heard of him?

Pete:
No, I don't think so. If I'm to look him up, Alan Sugar, see if I recognise his face. No.

Charlie:
Yeah.

Pete:
Business magnate. Huh? No. Don't know this guy. Ok. I thought it was going to be one of the guys on the Dragon's Den or whatever it's called, where they have like a group of guys who just roast, you know, people trying to launch their businesses.

Charlie:
Yeah, he's kind of in the same ballpark as them.

Pete:
Yeah.

Charlie:
So we've got a show called Dragons Den, where people come and show their inventions and then four very rich people, say that they will invest in the invention or say it's a shit invention, go away. And we've got some famous people around there. Can you remember the names of those dragons?

Pete:
There's an Australian one, I'm pretty sure. Isn't there? No, I don't remember any of them. I probably would recognise them if I heard the names, but I don't watch it unless it's like those short, sort of hot take clips on Facebook or on YouTube. So what do we got here? Yeah. Peter Jones, Deborah Meaden, Sarah Davies, Tej Lalwani. I think he's one of the funnier ones, right? The guy looks like he's of Indian descent. He's one of those- which- from ones that would roast people quite hard.

Charlie:
Yes. Yeah, I always remember Deborah Meaden. She always had quite a stern face about her.

Pete:
Oh yeah.

Charlie:
And Peter Jones as well. But yeah, I think in conversation, they might just talk about Dragons Den generally. So Dragons Den guys, this is relating to a show where people are pitching an idea and getting money for it. And, you know, then they, they get equity. These dragons get equity in the company. If it goes well,

Pete:
It's always entertaining, too. Sorry to cut you off there, because they always let the best and the worst in. It's kind of like American Idol or Australian Idol, I'm sure they've got, you know, UK idol where they they tend to let in the really good stars that are going to obviously get through. But then they also let in quite a few doozies. And so you'll have these people pitching these ideas on Dragons Den and you'll be like, did you guys like even run this past your family or something before doing this in front of, you know, these millionaires?

Charlie:
That's so true. Yeah, that's exactly like the X Factor or those singing competitions where they're like, 'How did you get to this point, where you think you can sing?'

Pete:
Bluffed my way through?

Charlie:
Yeah, it feels like it's cruelty from the family members not to step up and say, you suck. Yeah. So, yeah, going back to Alan Sugar, so he is the leading face or, yeah, the main- main guy around The Apprentice.

Pete:
Yeah, so he's Donald Trump in the UK, huh?

Charlie:
Yeah. Yeah. Until Donald Trump became, you know who he is, in the recent years? Yeah. Very much so, similar in that kind of sense. So he's a very, very famous and wealthy man. He's got this kind of no bullshit kind of approach, and he'll try to be very intimidating in a boardroom.

Pete:
Yeah.

Charlie:
And yeah, trying to scare the shit out of people. So if you ever hear his name Alan Sugar, that's- that's kind of what they're talking about, trying to scare people in the boardroom.

Pete:
And he's worth $1.2 billion. My God.

Charlie:
There we go. Yeah. So I want to talk about a different category again, and I want- I think, you know this guy. Yeah, yeah. So in the area of street art, we have a famous one called Banksy.

Pete:
Mm hmm.

Charlie:
You know, Banksy, right?

Pete:
Yeah. You should have got me to guess first. Yeah, he is...

Charlie:
That's true, that's true.

Pete:
Isn't he? Apparently, they think he's from one of those famous bands, right? Which band do they think he's from?

Charlie:
Massive Attack!

Pete:
That's right, because he- the art kept appearing everywhere that that band was touring. I think someone, you know, one of these people on the internet was trying to work it out, you know, the- these sort of internet investigators. And I'm pretty sure they worked out that the timing of the appearance of these different art pieces around the world coincided with Massive Attack touring the world. And so they were like, it's got to be someone in this band or associated with this band.

Charlie:
Right! Okay. Yeah, that makes sense. Yeah. So what would you say Banksy is famous for, though, irrespective of who Banksy might be?

Pete:
The little girl holding the balloon?

Charlie:
Ah, yeah.

Pete:
Isn't that the love heart balloon or something, or the rats recently? Was it the rats that were like smoking and hanging out the artwork that he's done? I think that's all I really know about it, is that famous kind of street art. That's again, I'm not really an art critic or critic, but it's kind of like, what would you say, like postmodern art, where he's taking all these kind of cultural references and combining different flavours. So, you know, there'll be a girl holding a grenade, but it's in the shape of a love heart or something.

Pete:
You know, this kind of like ironic juxtaposition between two very different things like love and beauty and extreme violence. You know, that sort of stuff that that is very thought provoking. And so his art has gotten a lot of attention over the years worldwide as a result of of effectively being a social criticism. I think a lot of the time, right, like he- his art is critiquing society and economy and all of that sort of stuff. And. And yeah, it's- it's gotten huge because he's done it. I think he's- he's done the art all over the world, but mostly it appears in Britain, right? And he's done some of these really big pieces where,, I think there was one that he did with a phone box. Didn't he, like, get a phone box and twist it up or something and then install it somewhere?

Charlie:
So not just graffiti, it was like a physical sculpture.

Pete:
Yeah, I'm pretty sure it was like he'd actually bought one of those red phone booths or boxes, whatever you guys call them, and chopped it up and then put it back together. Yeah, it's bent sideways. It looks like the shape of an L, but it's bleeding and it's got a pick axe hanging out of it. I'm pretty sure he did that. And..

Pete:
Yeah.

Pete:
Installed that somewhere. Like, just left it on the side- on the side of the road without telling anyone, obviously. He's done a few of them by the looks of it.

Charlie:
Yeah, it does. Yeah, and he's very interactive with the environment, which is quite cool. But again, so if he came up in conversation, probably you're, you know, walking around a town and you see some graffiti on the wall. And if it's quite artistic, if it's got quite interesting way of looking at life or it makes you think people might mention his name, might say, Oh, it looks like a piece of, a piece from Banksy, or it looks like somebody who's aspiring to be, you know, the next Banksy or something like that.

Pete:
I think the average millennial in Australia would know who Banksy is. I don't know about the older generation or younger generation, but definitely people within five or 10 years of my age would know who Banksy is just from the internet and TV and everything.

Charlie:
Nice.

Pete:
But my grandparents would be at a loss, they'd be like, what? And I would assume, you know, kids in primary school would also probably be like, huh?

Charlie:
Yeah, and think about it in the UK, if I ask my parents, they probably wouldn't know. Some, some of my friend's parents would definitely know. But yeah, my parents are not the most educated with street graffiti. So there we go. Banksy, B A N K S Y.

Charlie:
So again, wanted to jump into a new category just to give you a good, you know, general knowledge, if you will? So we've got the equivalent of Jerry Springer Show kind of thing. But in the UK, any- any idea of, any of these shows in the UK that exists? They might have come up on your YouTube or something like that.

Pete:
Perhaps if I heard it, but I'm- not from the top of my- my mind. No.

Charlie:
We've got the longest running show in the UK for this kind of thing is a guy called Jeremy Kyle.

Pete:
No, I don't think I know...

Charlie:
Jeremy Kyle.

Pete:
Let's see if I can...

Charlie:
Have a little Google.

Pete:
Jeremy Kyle. I assume that's spelt pretty much normally. Ok, yeah. Yeah. Oh, is this that? No, it's not that kind of like to catch a predator, dude. That's- that's the US. He looks like that guy, though.

Charlie:
Oh, OK. I don't know that one, but yeah. So, Jeremy Kyle runs a daytime TV show in the UK, and he invites people on who are having problems in- in the family. I'd say, yeah, relationship problems, one- one that really caught my attention and they always do this. They always have like this subtitle at the bottom, like a tagline of their problem. And one of them was "My homosexual partner is my brother." Or it was like a question. It was a question not a fact.

Pete:
Yeah. Yeah, yeah.

Charlie:
And it turned- they did a live DNA test, and then they recorded their results and the results came in that they were indeed blood brothers.

Pete:
Oh, but then- but you mean they didn't know that prior to, right? That they'd somehow, what...

Charlie:
They were both adopted.

Pete:
Yeah, OK. Jesus, because I was going to be like...

Charlie:
...were separated at birth.

Pete:
But why would you do a DNA test if it was your own brother that you were sleeping with? It's like, 'Hello?!' Like, just going to make sure maybe he was adopted? No. Yeah. Gotcha. That's- I've heard of those horrifying things happening. There was a- a TV show, a documentary about, I think it's called genetic attraction, where-.

Charlie:
Ok?

Pete:
People who come back into contact, when they've been separated their entire lives, like mother, son, daughter, father, siblings, they- when they try and develop a relationship after having not grown up together, the- a lot of the time the feelings of love end up manifesting the same way that you would with a stranger, right, that you get to know and then fall in love with because they haven't had that developmental progression of being a child and learning those taboos of like, this is your sibling. There's no way that you can ever love-love this person and have a relationship with them. And so there have been a few of those situations where you kind of like God, I'm so glad I'm not in that- in that person's shoes.

Charlie:
Yeah, tough.

Pete:
Well, poor people are, get engaged and then find out, you know, that they're siblings and you just like, good god. Like, imagine that.

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah, exactly. But thinking about it for language learning, it would be a great way to get exposure to daily English because a lot of the people on there will be using phrases that you'd hear, you know, and if you come and speak to locals, that's- that's how- how they'll sound.

Pete:
I thought you meant having a relationship with a relative.

Charlie:
Well, give it a go.

Pete:
Like, how is that going to help your English?

Charlie:
Yeah, guys, you know, be safe. Be safe. We want a widespread genetic, ah, gene pool.

Pete:
Maintain that genetic diversity.

Charlie:
Exactly. Yeah. Just to shout out a few problems. You know, that subtitle that I mentioned, one that I can see here after doing a Jerry- Jeremy Kyle horror stories in the images. One of them, 'I heard you're with another man. Stop blaming ghosts and admit that you're a cheat.' So obviously...

Pete:
I always- like, this is the- I definitely did grow up watching Jerry Springer. Jerry Springer is that American version, right? But it was always just so, so full on that you were like, These people have to be acting. Right, like they would, they would have the strangest situations where, I don't know some. Some guy is, you know, dating a girl and then also has a relationship with her grandmother. And you just like this, this has to be bullshit. There's no way; like- and if these were true, why the hell would you get on national TV to talk about it? Like, Jesus!

Charlie:
Yeah, that is confusing how they go on there, but that makes me think of Embarrassing Bodies. Have you got that TV show in Australia?

Pete:
Yeah, I've seen ... Embarrassing Bodies one, but I think the thing with that is that they get free health care, right, with these issues that they may have. And so they get on and they'll like, I've got, you know, a patch of hair growing out of my butthole or something like that. And they're like, All right, well, we'll get it sorted for you, but it's going on TV and everyone's going to see it. So ...

Charlie:
That sounds quite normal, doesn't it? A patch of hair in your butthole? Nah I'm joking. So yeah, that's Embarrassing Bodies. And yeah, they do get the medical bill paid for. But I suppose, you know, with The Jeremy Kyle Show, the people that come on there get a free lie detector test. So you know that- that saves them a few quid.

Pete:
Or they're actors and actresses and they're getting paid a salary.

Charlie:
I don't know. I might be naive, but I don't think that they're lying. But anyway, there we go. Jeremy Kyle is a daytime TV host for all of these kind of family affairs, dramas, etc. So if you, maybe if you are overhearing a domestic, which means an argument between a family, you might hear people referencing, 'Oh, they should probably go on Jeremy Kyle!', like that.

Pete:
And sort their problems out publicly, yeah.

Charlie:
Exactly. Yes, that's- that's what they mean by that. Ok, so we've got plenty more to get through, but that is the end of Part One. So thank you very much, public listeners. If you enjoyed that, then you know, maybe even write a review in the podcast app that you're listening to this on. But thank you very much, Pete, for doing that.

Pete has his own version of the British English podcast called the Aussie English Podcast, and you can go and check out him on www.aussieenglish.com.au ? Sorry...

Pete:
There, you got it.

Charlie:
Yeah, yeah, or obviously, in the podcast apps. Thank you very much, Pete, but we're going to be continuing the show with Part Two and Three for Premium Podcasts and Academy Listeners.

Pete:
See you guys!

Charlie:
All right. See you soon, guys. All the best.

We will be leaving part one there for today, but don't worry, we have Part Two and Three round the corner for you to enjoy. But first, make sure you utilise all of the learning resources available to you for this part. And then when ready, I'll see you in Part Two to continue the conversation. Thanks again for supporting me. This is my full time job. So, here's to many more episodes of The British English Podcast to help you improve your English.

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Podcast host: Charlie:
This will be quite a bit harder for you to understand, as there are a number of accents in the conversation, some poorly delivered at times, as you will notice.

Podcast host: Charlie:
But the aim is to give you a variety of dialects in one conversation and some dialogue to give you native expressions in context. So enter, if you will, to Charlie's pub and his imaginary world.

Character: Mike:
Alright geezer, how's it going?

Character: Chris:
Yes, I'm well thanks. How about you? Have you had a good day?

Character: Mike:
Can't say good mate. No my old man he's been giving me a right old earful for what happened on site last week.

Character: Chris:
Oh that's a pity. Are you back on your dad's building project again?

Character: Mike:
Sad to say mate, but yeah, I am. Couldn't resist this one though. Cash in hand, you know.

Character: Chris:
Oh fair play, hard to resist those I imagine. Oh, here she is.

Character: Emily:
Oh, hi.

Character: Chris:
I was wondering if you're ever going to join us tonight.

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